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​ILAB International Mentoring Programme

 29/11/2016

ILAB has recently launched the ILAB International Mentoring Programme. This programme aims to help young or recently launched booksellers throughout the world by offering support and counsel on a one to one basis.

How do the mentors and their mentees get matched?

A list of booksellers are prepared to volunteer their time and potential mentees are asked to contact the ILAB office for further information: Please email: editor@ilab.org

The ILAB Committee will review applications and make suggested matches between mentors and mentees.

Mentors and mentees will have a preliminary interview or talk, ideally in person at a book fair or other event. If they are unable to meet, a preliminary talk can take place by Skype or telephone. 

How often are the meetings?

Mentors should undertake to be available to offer advice at least one hour a month for a term of one year, and new booksellers should try to be flexible in working out mutually agreeable times. Whether they meet once a month or multiple times is up to them, as are the technical aspects of how the mentoring is performed.  What is important is that everyone feels comfortable.

Who should consider becoming a mentor?

We are seeking ILAB booksellers interested in supporting the future of the antiquarian book trade. It is an honourable and important role which will be recognised on the ILAB website. 

What's in it for mentees?

A friendly experienced bookseller willing to listen to problems and to help you find information you might need. A mentor can help you gain the knowledge and confidence to run a successful book business in challenging times. 

For further information, please contact the ILAB Office. 
 
ILAB has recently launched the ILAB International Mentoring Programme. This programme aims to help young or recently launched booksellers throughout the world by offering support and counsel on a one to one basis.

The ILAB International Mentoring Programme gives experienced booksellers the opportunity to lend a hand in the early days of a booksellerís career when help is likely most needed. There is nothing new about this: throughout the history of the book trade booksellers have helped each other.  But as large bookselling firms grow fewer, apprenticeships are on the wane.  By formally offering a mentoring programme ILAB hopes that younger booksellers who might not know how, or whom, to approach for advice will find a colleague willing to continue this tradition.